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Laryngomalacia and breastfeeding

Laryngomalacia, also known as “floppy larynx”, is a congenital condition where tissues are softer around the voice box and collapse in, partially blocking the airway. These babies tend to present first with feeding difficulties, struggling to transfer milk, and as such, lactation consultants are among the first health professionals to notice it. It may not be until around 2 months that the characteristic squeaky breathing becomes a noticable pattern. I have seen this condition quite a bit in the last few years (and most likely missed this in my first few years of being an LC), I write this article to share my experience as I have found it difficult to find information on the internet that specifically pertains to how breastfeeding looks in these babies.

What to look for:

  • Squeaky noise when breathing in.
  • Noisy when feeding or during sleep or when lying on their backs.
  • Low weight gain.
  • Poor milk transfer (breast and/or bottle); lots of pauses when feeding; long inefficient feeds.
  • Spilling or choking or coming off the breast to breathe.
  • Mouth breathing (babies should breathe through their nose).
  • Pale skin.
  • Weakness eg. floppy arms.
  • Chest retractions – skin sucking in around ribcage eg tracheal tug – when the skin sucks in at the bottom of the neck, between the collar bones.
  • Reflux is common


Breastfeeding can be challenging for these babies, as they understandably prioritise breathing over feeding. They may seem stressed when breastfeeding, stop feeding before taking a full feed and struggle to gain weight. Some babies do better when feeding from a bottle, though others struggle with bottlefeeding too; taking a long time to feed and needing to pause often. Mothers benefit from support from an IBCLC experienced in this area. We have tools to assess milk transfer and can support you with a feeding plan. It can be helpful to do a 24 milk production assessment; weighing the baby before and after feeds for a day, to work out how much extra milk baby needs. Many mothers end up predominantly pumping their milk for their baby. Though, a few babies will gain enough weight with smaller, very frequent feeds. Upright positioning or any position that ensures the babies neck is extended (to open the airway) is often better in these babies.

It is important to see a doctor for diagnosis. A GP will likely refer to an ENT (ear, nose, throat) doctor. Most babies improve with time, the condition is usually outgrown during the first year of life. For babies with mild to moderate laryngomalacia, treatment is usually to wait and watch, weighing baby regularly to ensure the baby is taking enough milk to thrive, though I have worked with a few babies with severe laryngomalacia who needed to be hospitalised or have surgery.

Have you breastfed a baby with laryngomalacia? Please feel free to leave a comment below to share your breastfeeding journey so that other mothers may benefit from your experience.

Availability during the holiday season

Often I am away during Christmas and New Year and unavailable for clients. This year I am staying in Perth. I will be away late January instead.

Breastfeeding mothers often find it difficult to access support at this time of year, so don’t hesitate to book a lactation appt if you are struggling.

It is also a good time to book the kids in for a cranio session during the school holidays.

Whatever you are doing during the holiday season, I hope you find time to relax and enjoy time with friends and family and to switch off from work and responsibilities.

Falling asleep during a session

Its quite common for babies to fall asleep during a cranio session. Occasionally an exhausted adult will also drop into sleep. Recently, I had a couple of kids fall asleep during the treatment – which is pretty special.

Cranio helps the body to shift out of a “fight or flight” state into “rest and repair”, sometimes this looks like sleep. Both my boys ask for cranio when they have difficulty getting to sleep and I have occasionally helped my friend’s kids get to sleep at night, while I am at their place. Once, my skeptical partner (who still doesn’t understand cranio) allowed me to do cranio while he lay on the beach as he drifted off into a blissful sleep (he put it down to the gentle lapping of the waves, not the touch!).

It really is a privilege to support any body to shift out of a busy state; to find a sense of stillness and calm (that continues beyond the confines of the treatment room).

Perhaps you need this at the end of a difficult year? Would you like to find a calm centre during the silly season?

Contact me to make an appt – your body will thank you!

Top six reasons your baby would benefit from cranio.

Cranio is a holistic, gentle treatment that supports the nervous system to down-regulate, which triggers the body’s own self-healing mechanism.  Because it is so gentle, it is perfect to use with babies. Plus babies systems are so potent and ready to shift easily back to balance – some just need a little cranio support.

Because cranio is not well known, parents may not know the kinds of things that cranio is good at addressing. Here are the top six issues I see in my cranio/lactation practice:

1. Your baby had significant bruising around their head after birth

Some babies complete their birth journey looking pretty beat up!

Check out the squashed nose and facial asymmetry on this little bub, I had the pleasure to treat. He was not able to latch onto the breast without a shield and had issues transferring milk (before cranio).

And that bruise on his head -ouch!

If after birth, your baby had significant bruising, forceps marks, chignon from vacuum extraction, a cephalohematoma or other abnormal head shape, it is a sign that baby has undergone some difficulty during birth and would benefit from cranio. Hospital staff are used to these kinds of injuries and often dismiss it, knowing that superficially these marks do disappear over the following weeks to months. But there can still be underlying physical and emotional tensions that are not yet integrated. These stress imprints remain in the tissues in obvious and less obvious ways. Babies may be very sensitive to touch on their head and may react strongly to clothes being pulled over their head. Other infant interventions like suctioning or fetal scalp monitors may also impact the tissues, in less obvious ways but may still be held in the system.

Cranio can find these holding patterns in the body and facilitate their system to gently release, leaving a sense of peace in the baby’s system.

2. Labour was prolonged or very fast

Babies have their own experience of birth, often linked to their mothers, but with their own unique pressures and stresses. If they have felt stuck for any reason or under a lot of pressure for a long amount of time this can influence their bodies, in particular the nervous system and the neck. They may have felt scared or panicked. If a prolonged labour ended up in emergency c-section then the baby may also feel disoriented, this can show as arching at the breast or pushing with the feet, the baby can feel stuck in the birth sequence of pushing from the uterine walls.

On the flip side, a fast birth may be a shock to the baby and can show up as activation in their nervous system.

Cranio acknowledges the birth experience and allows these physical and emotional tensions to release leading to happier well-adjusted babies.

3. You have been told your baby has a tongue tie

There is much controversy around tongue tie recently. Research is lacking around posterior tongue ties and lip ties, but that doesn’t mean they don’t exist. It helps to have bodywork before undergoing a tongue tie release. Cranio is a form of bodywork that can address other issues that may mimic the symptoms of tongue tie such as, cranial nerve dysfunction, tight fascia or general nervous system activation. If a couple of cranio treatments improves breastfeeding then the tongue tie procedure may be avoided; if it doesn’t, then the parent can feel confident that the procedure is necessary. It is also recommended to schedule a cranio treatment within 48 hrs of the tongue tie release, to optimise function and to reset the nervous system.

4. Your newborn has difficulty latching to the breast

Newborn babies have natural instincts to latch themselves to the breast after birth, if they can’t then there is usually a good reason for it. Often the mum feels like she is doing something wrong, but it is actually because the baby is in pain, tense, stressed or medicated from birth. Perhaps there is a tongue tie or tight jaw muscles? Cranial nerve function can be impeded due to compression of cranial bones which can affect tongue function and sensation. The earlier cranio treatment is given the better in these circumstances.

5. Your baby cries a lot

Babies cry to communicate and once that need is met usually stop crying. If your baby cries inconsolably or with a high pitch then they may need some cranio support. Some babies have musculoskeletal pain or discomfort from birth. Others have a strong need to tell their birth story through memory crying. I have successfully treated babies who have cried excessively since birth. Cranio provides deep listening as well as addressing any physical tensions and may help get to the root cause of their suffering.

6. Baby has a head preference/torticollis or breastfeeding is painful on one side

This gorgeous little guy needed a few cranio sessions for torticollis that was affecting latch at the breast and also causing him discomfort.

Babies with a stiff neck tend to have trouble with positioning and latch. Tight inutero environments and/or asynclitic positions during birth may impact the neck/shoulders and jaw and other parts of the body. This can cause breastfeeding difficulties which tend to be slow to resolve on their own. Cranio helps the body let go of these restrictions and then breastfeeding often becomes easier.

Birth is a formative experience. Its impact is imprinted in the tissues of the body and can influence the health and wellbeing of the person from infant to adulthood. Early cranio treatment can prevent future difficulties such as headaches, anxiety and more.

As the twig is bent, so grows the tree

Alexander Pope

Often an hour or so of skin to skin after birth helps the mum and baby to integrate the birth experience and let go of any held tensions; sometime this doesn’t happen, sometimes it does – but bub needs more support.

Contact me to book your baby in for a treatment.

Photos used with parents permission*

Six issues that cranio works quickly to help in babies

Cranio is a gentle, holistic treatment that has the potential to facilitate profound changes in the body, which can make all the difference to an infant’s sense of wellbeing. Babies often find it to be very relaxing and parents often notice they feel a lot calmer too after their baby receives treatment. Babies tend to respond quickly to cranio, often only needing between 1-3 treatments. These six issues can be easily addressed in one session:

1. Your labour was induced

Induction via a Syntocinon drip can feel intense to mothers, often we overlook the experience of the baby. Babies play an active role in birth; pushing off the uterine walls with their feet, twisting and turning to find their way out. Induction overrides this natural pacing and sequence. During a cranio treatment I may palpate tones of urgency and fear. These stress imprints often resolve within one cranio treatment where they otherwise may be held in the body and impact on feeding, sleep and baby behaviour. Feeling of self-empowerment are often restored after a cranio treatment.

2. Your baby is restless when sleeping or difficult to settle to sleep

This may be related to a difficult birth experience, sometimes these babies are in shock from the birth or stuck in “fight or flight” mode with their nervous system is dialled up. Cranio helps to calm the nervous system. This isn’t just within a treatment, but often continues afterwards. Babies then feel safe enough to drop into a deep sleep. *Other reasons may include food sensitivities and may not be as easily addressed with cranio.

3. Your newborn baby falls asleep at the breast within 5 minutes

Medication or anaesthesia from birth may still be influencing baby. Or the baby may be in parasympathetic shock after birth. This is the freeze aspect of the nervous system survival mode – “fight, flight or freeze”. Cranio can clear this dissociative state so that baby is more alert to feed.

4. Your baby has poor eye contact

We underestimate babies. They have a strong capacity for connection and can make deep eye contact if they feel safe and are not holding on to difficult experiences. Babies often have improved capacity for eye contact after cranio treatment.

5. Your baby was exposed to medication (during pregnancy, birth or anytime afterwards)

Perhaps you had to take medication (including antidepressants, pethidine) during pregnancy or labour. Sometimes this is unavoidable and in the best interests of both mum and baby. Or maybe your baby had to have antibiotics for a health concern.

A baby may need a little support to help clear the side effects from their system, usually one session is all that is needed.

6. Baby vomits or hiccups excessively

There may be tensions in the diaphragm that cranio can help to release.


Ideally babies would have treatment in the weeks and months following birth, but it is never too late to book in. Please share with anyone you know who is pregnant or has a baby.

Please contact me to book an appt for your baby.

Price increase

As of 1st January 2021 I will be increasing my prices for new clients:

  • Lactation clinic consults: $180
  • Baby* /Child cranio: $70
  • Adult Cranio: $90
  • Mum and Bub cranio: $140

Home visiting in Perth area and surrounds.

  • $20 extra travel charge within the service area
  • $35 extra travel charge for areas outside of the service area

*I will continue to offer monthly, low-cost baby cranio clinics once, so babies can access this therapy despite parental financial restrictions.

Antenatal lactation consults

Occasionally I am asked to do an antenatal breastfeeding consult. This is a great idea for all women planning to breastfeed, but particularly for mothers having subsequent babies with a history of difficult breastfeeding issues; those that did not breastfeed for as long as they had planned. There is also a huge benefit of this personalised care for women with specific medical problems who suspect there may be supply issues, Having the right information and resources up front can help to optimise milk supply and breastfeeding success.

Forming a relationship with a lactation consultant beforehand makes it that bit easier to obtain help post-partum. Mums can be overwhelmed, exhausted and in pain and can be shocked to find out that there is not a lot of support within the system. This varies depending on place of birth or whether there is a free lactation clinic within the bounds of their locality. Child health nurses do their best but are often time poor and their breastfeeding education varies from individual to individual. Dads/ partners are often the ones to call private lactation consultants when they have reached a dead-end of support for their partners. For this reason it is often recommended that partners also attend breastfeeding education consults so they have the information and tips to provide support.

Having a basic understanding of the physiology of breastfeeding and what to expect from a breastfeeding newborn can make a huge difference to stress levels of new parents. Some private health funds do cover antenatal lactation consults. For a slightly cheaper option the Australian Breastfeeding Association does some great group classes on weekends – I used to teach these myself. Unfortunately you cannot rely on many hospital based breastfeeding classes – the information is minimal and sub par (please correct me if things have improved since I had kids).

If this sounds like it would be helpful, please get in touch to set yourself up for a smoother breastfeeding experience – $130 for 1.5hr consult.

The complexities of touch

Early experiences of rough or insensitive handling, by hospital or NICU staff after birth, can influence how physical contact is received late in life. While these memories are not usually conscious, clients with this history may dissociate or feel tense or like they want to run away or strike out when receiving touch. This patterned reaction to touch may plague the client’s intimate relationships, as well as arising in bodywork. During a cranio session, a client is assisted to become aware of their ability in present time to protect themselves, get up and leave, negotiate the contact or simply speak, which can support them in shifting their relationship to this imprint.

Frankyln Sills – Foundations in Craniosacral Biodynamic p358

Just wanted to share a passsage from one of the leaders in this field – Frankyn Sills (I have paraphrased slightly). I have seen these imprints and reactions to touch in babies, children and adults. The earlier you treat the better, so these implicit memories have less of an influence in later life. Cranio is an ideal way to redefine your relationship to touch. If you resonate with this, or feel your baby or child may have specific touch needs based on their past history – please consider booking in for a cranio treatment.