Top six reasons your baby would benefit from cranio.

Cranio is a holistic, gentle treatment that supports the nervous system to down-regulate, which triggers the body’s own self-healing mechanism.  Because it is so gentle, it is perfect to use with babies. Plus babies systems are so potent and ready to shift easily back to balance – some just need a little cranio support.

Because cranio is not well known, parents may not know the kinds of things that cranio is good at addressing. Here are the top six issues I see in my cranio/lactation practice:

1. Your baby had significant bruising around their head after birth

Some babies complete their birth journey looking pretty beat up!

Check out the squashed nose and facial asymmetry on this little bub, I had the pleasure to treat. He was not able to latch onto the breast without a shield and had issues transferring milk (before cranio).

And that bruise on his head -ouch!

If after birth, your baby had significant bruising, forceps marks, chignon from vacuum extraction, a cephalohematoma or other abnormal head shape, it is a sign that baby has undergone some difficulty during birth and would benefit from cranio. Hospital staff are used to these kinds of injuries and often dismiss it, knowing that superficially these marks do disappear over the following weeks to months. But there can still be underlying physical and emotional tensions that are not yet integrated. These stress imprints remain in the tissues in obvious and less obvious ways. Babies may be very sensitive to touch on their head and may react strongly to clothes being pulled over their head. Other infant interventions like suctioning or fetal scalp monitors may also impact the tissues, in less obvious ways but may still be held in the system.

Cranio can find these holding patterns in the body and facilitate their system to gently release, leaving a sense of peace in the baby’s system.

2. Labour was prolonged or very fast

Babies have their own experience of birth, often linked to their mothers, but with their own unique pressures and stresses. If they have felt stuck for any reason or under a lot of pressure for a long amount of time this can influence their bodies, in particular the nervous system and the neck. They may have felt scared or panicked. If a prolonged labour ended up in emergency c-section then the baby may also feel disoriented, this can show as arching at the breast or pushing with the feet, the baby can feel stuck in the birth sequence of pushing from the uterine walls.

On the flip side, a fast birth may be a shock to the baby and can show up as activation in their nervous system.

Cranio acknowledges the birth experience and allows these physical and emotional tensions to release leading to happier well-adjusted babies.

3. You have been told your baby has a tongue tie

There is much controversy around tongue tie recently. Research is lacking around posterior tongue ties and lip ties, but that doesn’t mean they don’t exist. It helps to have bodywork before undergoing a tongue tie release. Cranio is a form of bodywork that can address other issues that may mimic the symptoms of tongue tie such as, cranial nerve dysfunction, tight fascia or general nervous system activation. If a couple of cranio treatments improves breastfeeding then the tongue tie procedure may be avoided; if it doesn’t, then the parent can feel confident that the procedure is necessary. It is also recommended to schedule a cranio treatment within 48 hrs of the tongue tie release, to optimise function and to reset the nervous system.

4. Your newborn has difficulty latching to the breast

Newborn babies have natural instincts to latch themselves to the breast after birth, if they can’t then there is usually a good reason for it. Often the mum feels like she is doing something wrong, but it is actually because the baby is in pain, tense, stressed or medicated from birth. Perhaps there is a tongue tie or tight jaw muscles? Cranial nerve function can be impeded due to compression of cranial bones which can affect tongue function and sensation. The earlier cranio treatment is given the better in these circumstances.

5. Your baby cries a lot

Babies cry to communicate and once that need is met usually stop crying. If your baby cries inconsolably or with a high pitch then they may need some cranio support. Some babies have musculoskeletal pain or discomfort from birth. Others have a strong need to tell their birth story through memory crying. I have successfully treated babies who have cried excessively since birth. Cranio provides deep listening as well as addressing any physical tensions and may help get to the root cause of their suffering.

6. Baby has a head preference/torticollis or breastfeeding is painful on one side

This gorgeous little guy needed a few cranio sessions for torticollis that was affecting latch at the breast and also causing him discomfort.

Babies with a stiff neck tend to have trouble with positioning and latch. Tight inutero environments and/or asynclitic positions during birth may impact the neck/shoulders and jaw and other parts of the body. This can cause breastfeeding difficulties which tend to be slow to resolve on their own. Cranio helps the body let go of these restrictions and then breastfeeding often becomes easier.

Birth is a formative experience. Its impact is imprinted in the tissues of the body and can influence the health and wellbeing of the person from infant to adulthood. Early cranio treatment can prevent future difficulties such as headaches, anxiety and more.

As the twig is bent, so grows the tree

Alexander Pope

Often an hour or so of skin to skin after birth helps the mum and baby to integrate the birth experience and let go of any held tensions; sometime this doesn’t happen, sometimes it does – but bub needs more support.

Contact me to book your baby in for a treatment.

Photos used with parents permission*

Navigating laser treatment for tongue tie. To stretch or not to stretch?

The topic of posterior tongue tie (PTT) and lip tie (LT) is a controversial one. Research is limited and opinions are divided. I have worked with mums who have found treating these issues to make all the difference in their breastfeeding journey. However I do have concerns around some current practices including:

  • routine stretches / oral exercises / active wound management
  • laser frenectomy for breastfeeding problems that have not been thoroughly assessed by an IBCLC
  • laser frenectomy for babies to prevent future issues

The Australian Dental Association (in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team) has recently released a “Ankyloglossia and Oral Frena Consensus Statement” which I feel addresses some of my concerns.

The prescription of routine stretches/exercises after a laser frenectomy varies between providers. These are well intentioned, with the idea that they will prevent the lingual frenulum from reattaching or scarring. A recent client was advised to do them 6 times a day, for 21 days! There is no scientific evidence to prove that they do in fact prevent reattachment – and what of the risks? We know that they can cause oral aversion and exacerbate feeding issues. Babies are very orally sensitive. We need to respect when they are telling us “no”. Overriding this can potentially disrupt the parental bond. As a craniosacral therapist, working with the nervous system, I have a unique perspective as I am able to assess the impact of persistent stretches on babies systems. Babies respond to difficult experiences with a fight or flight response. But because they are physically unable to run away or fight, they can easily shift into freeze – a dissociative state. This is a protective survival mechansim and, unless treated, can become a lifelong pattern. Undergoing a laser frenectomy can be a traumatic experience for both mother and baby. With care and sensitivity the body can integrate this trauma with minimal lasting impact. It is my opinion that constant stretches for weeks afterwards interferes with the integration of the trauma, instead driving it deeper into the body.

My other concern is that babies with feeding problems are able to undergo the procedure without a full feeding assessment by an IBCLC. Nipple pain and milk transfer issues may not be related to the oral anatomy. An IBCLC can help to rule out nipple infections and positioning and attachment issues potentially avoiding surgery. Also, 1-2 sessions of cranio/bodywork beforehand may address issues such as myofascial tightness / jaw issues / cranial nerve impingment that can impact breastfeeding. Then, if no improvement in feeding, laser frenectomy can be trialled, often as a last resort.

Non-surgical management strategies can be effective first-line therapies for management of functional limitations associated with ankyloglossia. Surgical management should be considered only after non-surgical management has failed to address the functional issue that led to the diagnosis.

ADA Statement

Finally, the procedure is often done to prevent future issues. Parents have a lot of fear around future issues with speech or dental issues. These aren’t yet substantiated by evidence. Social media perpetuates this fear. In my humble opinion, the only reason to treat PTT and LT in babies is for feeding issues.

“Further research is needed regarding other reported adverse health outcomes, such as problems with speech, malocclusion, lingual gingival recession and obstructive sleep apnoea as evidence of a consistent causative relationship is lacking. No evidence exists to support buccal or labial frena causing problems with feeding or speech.”

ADA statement

That said …despite no evidence, I have seen lip ties interfere with attachment/seal at the breast. And I have seen lip ties contribute to decay at the top of the central incisors.

Laser frenectomy (compared to scissors frenotomy) needs much more consideration as it is a longer and more traumatic procedure. Here in Perth, parents have a few options, my preferred referral is to one that does not recommend stretches and where it is a requirement that every baby is thoroughly assessed by an IBCLC before the procedure. The good news is, if babies do need to undergo laser treatment for tongue tie or lip tie, just one session of cranio can help them to integrate the experience, bringing them out of fight or flight or a dissociative state. This has lasting positive impacts on feeding and the nervous system.

Clicking while feeding

Clicking at the breast was the theme for last week. Clicking on its own can be normal and nothing to worry about though its worthwhile seeing an IBCLC if it presents alongside other concerns eg. latching issues/ sore nipples / fussiness at the breast or unsettled behaviour after feeds. Clicking is a temporary loss of suction/seal and can have many causes:
– it may simply be evidence of a baby trying to keep up with a fast flow of milk,
– it may be associated with tongue tie or lip tie
– or cranial nerve compression (the nerves that control the tongue / suck swallow breathe coordnation are not functioning optimally due to compression from birth).
– or may be related to jaw issues (assymmetry, tight jaw etc)
Cranio and lactation support may make a difference.